Category Archives: Ontario

A Vote for Ford is a Vote for Trump. Vote Canadian Instead.


Here’s a fun clip of Doug Ford defending Donald Trump, believing that lowering taxes is more important than sexual misconduct. In light of the tariffs on Steel and Aluminum that begin tonight at midnight, it is fair to say that Doug Ford is Un-Canadian, that he is on the side of the U.S.A.

Please use your vote to elect a Canadian who has the best interest of our country at the heart of their agenda. Mr. Ford supported his crack-addict brother continuing to mayor of the City of Toronto, the pussy-grabbing Trump, feels the bottom line is more important than sexual assault and doesn’t have one explanation about how he will fulfill any of their bizarre and empty platform promises.

Remember, a vote for Doug Ford is a vote for the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer. It’s a vote for social services disappearing and more importantly it’s a vote for Donald Trump! Come on, Ontario, you’re better than that.

Posted in Business, Canada, Canadian Money, Doug Ford, Ontario, Politics, Rob Ford, Toronto, Video | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Clearing Up Doug Ford’s Untruths

Posted in Alberta, Architecture, British Columbia, Business, Canada, Canadian Money, Doug Ford, Manitoba, Maritimes, Ontario, Politics, Rob Ford, Sakatchewan, Toronto, Video | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

No, this isn’t Family Guy – It’s the Rob Ford Crack Video

With Doug Ford shame looming in the near future, let’s take a moment and remember the funner brother. It will be more likely that Doug will punch a blind woman in the face before smoking crack but hey, never say never! Ontario has a really awkward decision to make: Is it time for the return of the United Farmers of Ontario?

Posted in Canadian Celebrities, Canadian Wlidlife, Canadiana, Current Events, Entertainment, Historical, Made in Canada, Ontario, Politics, Pop Culture, Rob Ford, Toronto, Video | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

A Brief History of Toronto

Carte des lacs du Canada – Early Map of the Great Lakes, 1744.

The City of Toronto had been called the Town of York prior to 1834 when it incorporated. But before that the first settlers were probably the Iroquoian-speaking Wendat people, who the Europeans called the Huron. These people settled on the north shore of Lake Ontario where they lived in longhouses. Wendat means peninsula-island dwellers this is because of the shape of the land on the north shore. They believed that the world was on an island resting on the back of a turtle.

Map from the attack of York 1813.

The natives used variations of the name Toronto for different areas in the vicinity, as well as for fishing tools that they used. The French then used it again when they named Fort Toronto at the foot of the Humber River. So, when the Town of York incorporated in 1834 it changed its name to Toronto. The legislative council changed York to Toronto because it was a more unique name and because of its native roots.

Drawing of Fort Toronto (uncredited)

Three weeks after Toronto incorporated, William Lyon Mackenzie was elected its first mayor. William Lyon Mackenzie was born in Scotland on March 12, 1795 and came to Canada in 1820. He was a reformer and the editor of the Colonial Advocate newspaper. He was only mayor for one year.

William Lyon Mackenzie (1834).

In 1837, Mackenzie led a rebellion in Upper Canada. The one and only battle took place at Montgomery’s Tavern. Although the battle ultimately lasted only a half an hour, and they lost, because of the rebellion the British Government realized the problems in Canada and made changes.

Drawing from the Upper Canada Rebellion showing the battle at Montgomery’s Tavern

Remaining from the old Town of York, the oldest building in Toronto is John Scadding’s cabin, which was built in 1794. It was located near the Don Valley but was later relocated, as a historical landmark to the Canadian National Exhibition grounds in 1879 by the York Pioneers Historical Society.

John Scadding’s Cabin, past and present

In 1834, the population of the City of Toronto was only 9,254. The boundaries of the city were between Lake Ontario on the South, Parliament street on the East , Bathurst street on the West, and 365 metres North of Lot street (now known as Queen street). The city was only 3.6 square kilometres. Today the population is a whopping 2.6 million people and the city covers 630 square kilometres.

City of Toronto today

by Kate Gendron (age 10)
Givin’s-Shaw Public School
Ms. Stockton’s Grade 4 Class Project
2017

Posted in Aboriginal, Architecture, Canada, Canadian Art, Canadian National Exhibition, CCT Now and Then, Historical, Ontario, Politics, Toronto | Tagged , , | 1 Comment